Saint of Mt. Koya
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He nodded his cheerful assent and said that whenever he made a pilgrimage to this part of the country he made a point of resting his pilgrim's staff for the night at a place called the Katoriya. 'Resting his pilgrim's staff for the night,' was the quaint way he phrased it. He explained that originally the Katoriya had been an ordinary inn until the proprietor's only daughter, who had been the most attractive feature about the place, died. After that, the family took down their sign, and although they no longer encouraged customers, they would still accommodate their old customers when the need arose. They were an old couple who provided simple hospitality for occasional travellers. The priest said that I would be welcome, if I liked, to put up with him there. "But," he cautioned putting down his lunch box, "you may have to get by with nothing better to eat than carrots and gourd shavings." With that he burst out laughing.

Apparently the priest had a sense of humor beneath his modest looks and bearing.


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Intangible