Herbert Quick: Photographer
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Quick's formal training as a photographer was taken at Art Center School of Design in Los Angeles in the late 1940s after his return from service with the United States Navy during World War II. At Art Center he learned important technical fundamentals of camera work and darkroom technique, especially in commercial applications, but it was his contact with the likes of Edward Weston that perhaps most dramatically shaped the character of his work and set the course his life would take from then on. Representing this period are a number of photographs, ranging from a marvelous portrait of jazz musician Kid Ory to his first crisp California landscapes.

While a student at Art Center he visited Weston in Carmel with portfolio in hand. Weston received him kindly and offered criticism and suggestions, despite the fact that Weston was suffering greatly from the ravages of Parkinson's disease by then. Quick would go away, make more photographs, and then return to Weston with the results. This contact continued for some time and allowed Quick to establish an intimacy with Weston's approach to photography and to place his own ideas within a new and more profound context. We can see in the landscapes and architectural images his progress from technical mastery toward a more profound application of purpose in his approach to composition and light. The photographs made on the California coast or in the Bay Area of northern California are particularly interesting in this regard.


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